April 20th – PHO

The Vietnamese Classic

Lightly poached flank steak in a vietnamese-spiced bone broth, fragrant herbs and rice noodles with home-made Sriracha.

OR

Vietnamese-spiced vegetable broth with tamari and sesame-marinated mushrooms, fragrant herbs, rice noodles and home-made Sriracha.

April 27th – PASSOVER

Poached matzo meal dumplings, fragrant chicken bone broth, shredded chicken, grilled spring onions, baby carrot and herb salad.

OR

Poached matzo meal dumplings, nage broth, Portobello mushroom, grilled spring onions, baby carrot and herb salad.

April 13th – NORDIC

Grilled sea trout, Icelandic skyr, dill oil, smoked and pressed potato, cured egg yolk, fermented greens + kelp salt

OR

New season Asparagus, Icelandic skyr, smoked and pressed potato, cured egg yolk, fermented greens + kelp salt

April 6th – CELERIAC

the most under-rated of vegetables…..

 

Whole roasted buttered celeriac with mangalitsa pancetta and toasted walnut salt in a Gubbeen and camomile broth served with a burnt celeriac butter toast

OR

Whole roasted buttered celeriac with toasted walnut salt in a Gubbeen and camomile broth served with
McNally’s greens + a burnt celeriac butter toast

MARCH 30th – TACOS

3 tacos (carnitas / avocado / aguachile)
with lime & sour cream grilled corn
and Mexican black beans

OR

3 vegetarian tacos served with
lime & sour cream grilled corn
and Mexican black beans

MARCH 23rd – KOREAN JJIGAE

Pork shoulder with baechu, homemade pickled vegetables, carrot and daikon kimchi, simmered in gochujang with scallion and served with steamed sticky rice and taberu rayu

OR

Crispy fried tofu with baechu, homemade pickled vegetables,  carrot and daikon kimchi, simmered in gochujang with scallion and tofu and served with steamed sticky rice and taberu rayu

MARCH 16th – PINTXOS

 

From Basque Country…

Mushroom croquettas, pintxos de tortilla, pulpo a la gallega, pressed pig cheeks.

OR

Mushroom croquettas, pintxos de tortilla, manchego and honey, marinated olives

 

March 9th – RAMEN

Cured ham broth, pressed pork belly, ajitsuke egg, katsuobushi salt, fresh egg noodles and pickled kombu

OR

Umami-rich miso broth, ajitsuke egg, gomashio, fresh egg noodles,tare marinated mushrooms and pickled kombu

fresh cheese from waste milk

When a barista makes a milky drink, a flat white, latte etc. nine times out of ten they will have some frothy milk leftover in the end of their jug. The better the barista, the less milk there will be but generally there is always a little something. For most people this goes down the sink, as the jug gets washed before the next coffee is made. And indeed for years this is what we did. Until we realized we could be saving this milk and using it to make cheese.

 

We call it a ricotta even though purists would say that it is not, as it is not made from whey**. But ricotta literally just means re-cooked {ri-cotta ; re-cooked} and this is exactly what we are doing with the milk. It is ‘cooked’ first in the initial steaming for the coffees, and then we ‘re-cook’ it again in the second heating when we add lemon juice to produce the cheese curds.

We don’t have an exact recipe to give you, I have to admit our methods for this are quite crude. Roughly when we have around eight litres of leftover milk, which takes about 2-3 days,  we heat it until just boiling, add a glass of lemon juice (around 300ml) and then take it off the heat straight away. We give it just two stirs with a wooden spoon and then let it rest for a few minutes. You should see the curds separating almost straight away. Let it cool slightly and then separate the curds from the whey by straining the liquid through a cheesecloth or cheese baskets.

 

We get about 1kg of cheese from 8 litres of milk which we then season and mix with herbs and spices for our sandwiches and specials, or give it to our baker to use in some of the cakes as a cream cheese substitute.

 

 

 

**How ricotta is traditionally made: 
The whey (the leftover liquid) from an initial cheesemaking process is used to make a second cheese. It is re heated and a coagulant is added, namely lemon juice or another acid, producing the soft cheese that we know as ricotta. Generally it is pretty flavourless as all the flavour from the milk has gone into the initial cheese. But a healthy bit of seasonaing and you have a delicious soft cheese. Made from from a waste product. Bonus.